Protests arise after Indonesian police is now allowed to use live ammunition for riot control


JAKARTA, INDONESIA (BNO NEWS) — Human rights activists on Monday objected the new regulation that allows National Police forces in Indonesia to use live ammunition to control riots and other anarchic situations.

According to the Jakarta Globe, the new regulation is intended to be used against protesters and rioters that become uncooperative, violent and attack others. The measure was issued by the outgoing National Police Chief, General Bambang Hendarso Danuri.

“This regulation is madness. It does not minimize police’s excessive use of force but instead increases police brutality further,” said Poengky Indarti, executive secretary of the Indonesian Human Rights Monitor (Imparsial).

The resolution was signed last Friday and is intended to control riots and any other group that commits acts of anarchy. However, the measure only allows police officers to use live ammunition to immobilize and not to kill.

Recently, Indonesian religious minority groups have been the target of violent attacks by Islamic extremists. In response, the National Police collaborated with the Commission for Missing Persons and Victims of Violence (Kontras) for creating the regulations.

Poengky said that police forces should focus more on preventive measures than in allowing the use of real bullets after considering that this will only increase police abuses, violations of human rights and bloodshed.

In June, there were at least 135 cases of excessive use of police force since 2005. Last week, a brawl between citizens and police forces in Wamena, Papau, resulted in the death of three civilians

Last month, two rival gangs clashed with firearms and even machetes in a street battle. In consequence, three people were killed and about a dozen injured, including three police officers. The fight took place in front of the South Jakarta court building.

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